Posted on
Thursday,
7 Jan 2016

Indoor Training Plan



Indoor Trainers

There’s no better time to haul out your indoor trainer than when its dark outside and the weather is wet and cold. “There are some great benefits of wind trainer riding” says 8 time Ironman competitor Gavin Nugent. “But keeping it interesting can be a real challenge.” So here’s a couple of Gavin’s great wind trainer programs that should spice up your home training sessions.

Benefits of wind trainer riding (especially in winter)

1. It always warm, never rains and never gets windy.

2. You don’t need to wear all those layers of gear - and it’s OK to go without a helmet.

3. Your bike won’t need cleaning anywhere near as often.

4. You avoid the ever present road riding hazards – glass, bad roads, dogs and yes, cars! So you’re much less likely to get punctured or injured.

5. If you’re into triathlons or duathlons it’s ideal for transition training. You do your bike session, leap off your wind-trainer, put on your running shoes and you’re out the door and running 30 seconds later.

6. Ideal for interval training. You can gauge each interval exactly without all the usual variations provided by the riding hazards in point 4, uneven terrain and foul wind or weather.

7. You can do as many hill sessions as you like by doing low rpm's in a big gear.

8. If you get a puncture there’s very little chance of coming off and its easy to find a comfy spot to change it close by.

9. You get to watch lots of movies. No extra time wasted.

Aerobic power 1 (50 minutes)
15 minutes – Warm up (increasing intensity)
5 x (4min high intensity + 2min low intensity)
5 minutes cool down

This program is designed to increase your maximum oxygen consumption. It gives you 20 minutes at a very high oxygen consumption, but it is not designed to be ridden to complete exhaustion.

Your VO2 max will gain improvements even at a more comfortable pace. It is, however, still important to push yourself very hard during the intervals. In the resting periods you should maintain an intensity at about 60% of VO2 max.

Aerobic power 2 (49 minutes)
15 minutes – warm up (increasing intensity)
5 x (40 sec. very high intensity – 20 sec. low intensity)
3 minutes recovery
5 x (40 sec. very high intensity – 20 sec. low intensity)
3 minutes recovery
5 x (40 sec. very high intensity – 20 sec. low intensity)
3 minutes recovery
5 x (40 sec. very high intensity – 20 sec. low intensity)
5 minutes cool down

This program is also designed to increase your maximum oxygen consumption. You work with a slightly higher intensity during the intervals than in the previous ‘Aerobic Power 1’ program. You will also gain increments in your anaerobic capacity.

You can expect results after only a couple of training sessions. This program really rocks.

Anaerobic power 1 (50 minutes)
15 minutes – warm up (increasing intensity)
5 x (60sec. maximum intensity + 6 min. recovery)

This program is designed to increase your anaerobic capacity. During the intervals the body is exposed to enormous amounts of anaerobic metabolits. After only a few of these sessions your body will be better to work at an anaerobic enviroment. This skill is primarily used in competitions, where jumps and sprints demand anaerobic efforts. This art of training is very exhausting and therefore it should primarily be used for competition preparation.

Click here to see some of our trainers----- https://www.bikeexchange.com/a/bike-trailers/giant/pa/nazareth/cyclotron-mag-ii/100652479